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Worth Corn, Journalist

By Ashley Runnion

Worth Corn graduated Western Carolina University in 2004 and quickly began his career as a journalist.  "WCU helped me fine tune my English skills, and allowed me to explore some of the ins and outs of both journalism and writing in general—both creative and not," claims Corn.

A journalist's path

After moving back to Cullowhee, NC in 2008, Corn worked for The Mountaineer in Waynesville, NC as a writer, designer, and copy editor. Shortly after graduation but before working at The Mountaineer, Corn was the sports editor at The Stokes News in Stokes County, NC for nearly four years.

Corn uses his writing and editing skills daily.  He writes three to five stories per week for The Guide, the arts and entertainment section of the paper, and edits countless other sections. The rest of his time is spent editing copy for The Biltmore Beacon, a free weekly paper for the Biltmore community in Asheville, NC.

A truly inspirational job

Corn's typical day runs from 8 am to 5 pm, five days a week.  He spends his mornings working on layouts and fills his evenings writing stories and answering emails. The passion of interviewing people inspires Corn to come to work every day. When he works on a story or conducts an interview, he sees people's faces light up with enthusiasm, and their enthusiasm is catching. Knowing that people are interested in contributing to his story keeps Corn excited about his job.

The best advice Corn can give, in regards to journalism and life in general, is to be flexible.  "Stories fall apart sometimes, so you have to be willing to shift your plans and refocus from time to time," says Corn.   



These profiles were created by the Karen Greenstone's English 303 class (spring 2009)
and edited for the web by Mary Adams's English 303 class (summer 2009).

Students in Mary Adams's English 303 class (fall 2009) wrote additional profiles.